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Saturday, August 1, 2020 | History

2 edition of effect of cost-sharing on the utilization of prescription drugs for chronically ill patients found in the catalog.

effect of cost-sharing on the utilization of prescription drugs for chronically ill patients

Matthew D. Solomon

effect of cost-sharing on the utilization of prescription drugs for chronically ill patients

by Matthew D. Solomon

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  • 1 Currently reading

Published by RAND Corp. in Santa Monica, CA .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Drug utilization -- United States.,
  • Drugs -- Purchasing -- United States.,
  • Prescription pricing -- United States.,
  • Older people -- Drug use -- United States -- Costs.,
  • Patient compliance -- United States.

  • Edition Notes

    StatementMatthew D. Solomon.
    SeriesDissertation (Pardee Rand Graduate School) -- RGSD-193
    ContributionsPardee Rand Graduate School., Rand Corporation.
    The Physical Object
    Paginationxii, 135 p. :
    Number of Pages135
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL20572135M

      Previous studies have shown that increased cost sharing reduces the use of and adherence to drugs. 10–14 Research focused specifically on high-cost specialty drugs has found mixed results on whether benefit generosity influences patients' drug use and, if Cited by: Patient cost-sharing for primary care and prescription drugs is designed to reduce the prevalence of moral hazard in medical utilization. Yet the success of this strategy depends on two factors: the elasticity of demand for those medical goods, and the risk of downstream hospitalizations by reducing access to beneficial health care.

    A copayment or copay is a fixed amount for a covered service, paid by a patient to the provider of service before receiving the service. It may be defined in an insurance policy and paid by an insured person each time a medical service is accessed. It is technically a form of coinsurance, but is defined differently in health insurance where a coinsurance is a percentage payment .   On Friday, Febru the USC-Brookings Schaeffer Initiative for Health Policy hosted a conference on the policy issues surrounding patient drug cost sharing. Two panels convened, first to.

    This study assesses the impact of reductions in cost sharing for prescription drugs on preventable hospitalizations and outpatient care utilization among the elderly in the United States. In addi-tion to a↵ecting demand for drugs, drug cost sharing can also a↵ect the demand for complement services, such as primary or preventive care. On Friday Febru the USC-Brookings Schaeffer Initiative for Health Policy will host an event on policy issues surrounding patient cost sharing for Start Date:


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Effect of cost-sharing on the utilization of prescription drugs for chronically ill patients by Matthew D. Solomon Download PDF EPUB FB2

Results suggest that a significant portion of the reduction in prescription drug utilization that is mediated by cost may occur when patients make the initial decision to pharmacologically treat a newly diagnosed chronic condition, but that cost-sharing may be less influential on utilization once patients have initiated therapy.

Effect of cost-sharing on the utilization of prescription drugs for chronically ill patients. Santa Monica, CA: RAND Corp., (OCoLC) Online version: Solomon, Matthew D. Effect of cost-sharing on the utilization of prescription drugs for chronically ill patients.

Santa Monica, CA: RAND Corp., (OCoLC) Material Type. Medications are a crucial component of the therapeutic regimen for the chronically ill, 7 and the interruption of drug therapy can have negative health consequences, 8,9 particularly for the elderly, who have the highest rates of chronic disease and prescription drug use.

12–15 Studies measuring the effect of pharmacy benefits designs on drug Cited by: The effects of prescription drug cost sharing: A review of the evidence for chronically ill patients. At times, higher levels of cost sharing can affect the use of essential medications and. Cost Sharing and the Initiation of Drug Therapy for the Chronically Ill Article in Archives of internal medicine (8); discussion April with 26 Reads How we measure 'reads'.

The Effect of Cost-Sharing on the Utilization of Prescription Drugs for Chronically Ill Patients Matthew D. Solomon This document was submitted as a dissertation in September in partial fulfillment of the requirements of the doctoral degree in public policy analysis at the Pardee RAND Graduate School.

The faculty committee that supervised. Despite the market trends in increasing patient out-of-pocket (OOP) costs for specialty drugs, the impact of patient cost sharing on specialty drug utilization and outcomes is. Results: Higher levels of prescription drug cost sharing generally produce intended effects, namely, decreasing the consumption of prescription.

Many chronically ill patients take less of their medication than has been prescribed, owing to cost concerns, especially those patients with low incomes, multiple chronic health problems, or no prescription drug coverage.1– 3 The consequences of cost-related medication underuse include increased emergency department visits, psychiatric admissions, and nursing home Cited by: More generic prescription drugs are being placed on higher formulary tiers, meaning patients have a higher cost-sharing for these drugs, the Avalere analysis revealed.

Fifty-three percent fewer generic drugs were placed on the lowest tier – which yielded the lowest cost-sharing – between and   Context Many health plans have instituted more cost sharing to discourage use of more expensive pharmaceuticals and to reduce drug spending.

Objective To determine how changes in cost sharing affect use of the most commonly used drug classes among the privately insured and the chronically ill. Design, Setting, and Participants Retrospective US study Cited by: Introduction The problem with medication costs.

The costs of prescription drugs pose a growing burden to health care payers and patients (Gabel et al., ).In the United States, the average number of prescriptions per person more than doubled between and (Schur, Doty, & Berk, ).

$ billion dollars were spent on prescription drugs in (a 15% increase Cited by: By contrast, the switch by Employer 2 from a two-tier to a three-tier formulary with no increases in cost sharing for drugs in tiers 1 and 2 had little effect on the probability of the use of a Cited by: The evidence clearly suggests that patients are responsive to the cost-sharing arrangements in prescription drug plans, even among the chronically ill.

Benefit caps act in a manner consistent with other cost-sharing features; however, little is known about the dynamics of these by:   Objectives To determine (1) the impact of introducing prescription drug cost-sharing on use of essential and less essential drugs among elderly persons and welfare recipients and (2) rates of emergency department (ED) visits and serious adverse events associated with reductions in drug use before and after policy by: of-pocket (OOP) costs for specialty drugs, the impact of patient cost sharing on specialty drug utilization and out-comes is unclear.

Numerous reviews have summarized the relationship between cost sharing and utilization of tradi-tional oral drugs, but none have evaluated the evidence as it relates to specialty pharmaceuticals Such a review isCited by:   Chronically ill facing high drugs costs under U.S.

health law But patient advocates say the spike in cost-sharing means chronically ill people could reach those caps quickly, in some cases Author: David Morgan. A number of studies have suggested that the modest cost sharing typically concomitant with CDHPs may reduce patients’ use of prescription drugs, including among the.

The E⁄ect of Patient Cost-sharing on Utilization, Health and Risk Protection: Evidence from Japan Hitoshi Shigeokay Novem Job Market Paper Abstract Cost-sharing, requiring patients to pay a share of the cost of care, is one main strategy for the government to contain health care costs.

A key question is how much cost-sharing a File Size: 1MB. This brief summary of a similarly titled AARP Public Policy Institute report by Cindy Parks Thomas of Brandeis University looks at prescription drug use by older adults and its effect on use of non-drug services and suggests factors policy makers should keep in mind when considering changes in coverage for prescription drugs and other health care services.

Goldman DP, Joyce GF, Escarce JJ, et al. Pharmacy benefits and the use of drugs by the chronically ill. Journal of the American Medical Association. May ;(19) This study examines how changes to the design of health plan benefits among privately insured populations affected the use of the most common drug classes.some drugs classes aimed at chronic conditions (statins, ACE inhibitors, and proton-pump inhibitors) after copayment increases.

Goldman et al () show that this is due to the fact that chronically ill patients decrease utilization of their nonessential medications more so than their chronic care drugs when copayments are increased  The goal of our study was to evaluate the impact of two cost-containment strategies on prescription drug utilization and costs, as well as on the financial burden on patients, in an ambulatory.